View The Crime Map – Raids Online

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 RAIDS Online helps the public get a better idea of the crime activity in their area so they can make more informed decisions about how to stay safe.

Reduce crime and improve public safety. BAIR Analytics’s public crime map, RAIDS Online, connects law enforcement with the community to reduce crime and improve public safety. Crime mapping helps the public get a better idea of the crime activity in their area so they can make more informed decisions about how to stay safe.

RAIDS Online goes beyond crime mapping by automatically alerting the public about recent crime activity and by improving communication between the public and law enforcement through anonymous tips. RAIDS Online empowers the public to make better decisions about crime by putting the same technology used by law enforcement to analyze and interpret crime activity into the hands of the public.


Sources of information

RAIDS Online compiles crime data and other information from law enforcement agencies to make it easier for the public to stay informed about crime. Data in RAIDS Online is provided directly from each law enforcement agency. Because RAIDS Online is just the public side of a much more robust crime data sharing and analysis system for law enforcement, we take every step to ensure that the data is of the highest quality and accuracy. To uphold these quality standards, BAIR works with each agency to set up an automated feed of the data from their crime database into the RAIDS database. Receiving the data directly from each law enforcement agency ensures that the data is always up to date, accurate and complete.

You can see the source of the crime data for any incident by clicking on the incident on the map. The information window lists the “Agency” that provided the information. The Metadata tab also lists the source and links to each source’s web page for the incidents that are currently in view.

How does it work?

Law enforcement agencies keep detailed records about each incident that occurs in their jurisdiction. When an incident happens, the officer that responded to the incident writes a detailed report with information about the event including the location, people involved, related vehicles and other useful information. This information is stored in large, secure databases within each law enforcement agency. Between departments, these databases can vary in structure and complexity, and even the data itself can follow different standards to describe the event. This can make it difficult for two neighboring cities to share crime data and benefit from being able to analyze events and offenders that cross city boundaries. BAIR’s regional data sharing products help centralize and standardize this information into a national database of crime to improve regional data sharing and analysis. RAIDS Online takes this data, cleans it to protect victim privacy, and displays it to the public so citizens can be aware of the events that occur in their area and take action to stay safe.

How can your city participate?

BAIR Analytics offers RAIDS Online as a way to give back to the community. As former (and current) analysts and officers, BAIR hopes to help law enforcement and defense use cutting edge analytics to protect and serve the community. Providing crime mapping and tips to the community helps law enforcement keep the public aware of crime, it builds trust with their citizens and it improves communication between the public and law enforcement. By allowing law enforcement to provide these services to the public at no cost through RAIDS Online, BAIR reduces any barriers for law enforcement to use public crime mapping as a crime reduction strategy.


Don’t see crime data in your city?

Contact the Public Information Officer in your city to request that they start sharing crime information with you through RAIDS Online. It’s absolutely free for your city to participate, so there’s no reason for them not to join RAIDS Online.

These Greater Cincinnati communities rank among best places to live

CINCYBIZ BLOG
A new study ranks 18 Greater Cincinnati neighborhoods among the 25 best places to live in their respective states.

The new rankings are from the national website Niche, which collects data based on crime, public schools, cost of living, job opportunities and local amenities. Data comes from the U.S. Census, FBI and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among other sources.

Eleven Southwest Ohio communities rank in the top 25 places to live in the Buckeye State:

No. 3: Deerfield Township

No. 4: Wyoming

No. 8: Mariemont

No. 12: Blue Ash

No. 14: Mason

No. 18: Symmes Township

No. 19: Madeira

No. 21: Anderson Township

No. 22: Columbia Township

No. 23: Montgomery

No. 24: Landen

Seven Northern Kentucky communities rank among the top 25 in the Bluegrass State:

No. 3: Fort Mitchell

No. 11: Fort Thomas

No. 13: Southgate

No. 14: Oakbrook (Boone County)

No. 18: Park Hills

No. 20: Florence

No. 25: Union

Two Franklin County communities, Upper Arlington and Grandview Heights, were rated the top places to live in Ohio. Los Alamos, N.M., was rated the best place to live in the U.S. Devon, Pa., was rated the nation’s best place to raise a family.

NOTICE OF 2017 BUDGET PUBLIC HEARING

Notice is hereby given that on July 7, 2016 at 4:00 pm, a public hearing will be held on the 2017 Budget prepared by the Board of Trustees of Columbia Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, for the next succeeding year ending December 31, 2017.The hearing will be held at Columbia Township Maintenance & Administration Building, 5686 Kenwood Road Cincinnati, Ohio 45227

Press Release – Ohio Treasurer’s Office on OhioCheckbook.com

NORWOOD – Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel announced today the launch of the Norwood City Schools and Columbia Township online checkbooks on OhioCheckbook.com.  In December 2014, Treasurer Mandel launched OhioCheckbook.com, which sets a new national standard for government transparency and for the first time in Ohio history puts all state spending information on the internet.  OhioCheckbook.com recently earned Ohio the number one government transparency ranking in the country for a second year in a row.

The Ohio Treasurer’s office was joined at today’s announcement by Norwood City Schools Superintendent Robert Amodio and Columbia Township Trustees Chris Kritikos and Susan Hughes.  Norwood City Schools is the sixth school district in Hamilton County to post their spending on OhioCheckbook.com, and Columbia Township is the third township in Hamilton County to post their spending on OhioCheckbook.com.

The following is a breakdown of today’s local government sites:

  • Norwood City Schools’ online checkbook includes over 100,000 individual transactions that represent more than $178 million of total spending over the past four Fiscal Years.
  • Columbia Township’s online checkbook includes over 9,400 individual transactions that represent more than $9.4 million of total spending over the past four years.

“I believe the people of Hamilton County have a right to know how their tax money is being spent, and I applaud local leaders here for partnering with my office to post the finances on OhioCheckbook.com,” said Treasurer Mandel.  “By posting local government spending online, we are empowering taxpayers across Ohio to hold public officials accountable.”

“We are very excited to implement the checkbook initiative,” said Norwood City Schools Superintendent Robert Amodio.  “We feel that it creates even further fiscal transparency that will allow our local resident taxpayers a further ability to view our fiscal conservancy with their tax money. As a district we believe that this initiative is in line with our commitment that we are true partners with our residents as we seek to enhance the fiscal trust that they have placed in us.”

“While some will say this is about transparency in local government, we believe users of OhioCheckbook.com will discover the determined efforts of officials and staff, year after year, to provide the best services possible to constituents at an effective cost,” said Columbia Township Administrator Michael Lemon.

On April 7, 2015 Treasurer Mandel sent a letter to 18,062 local government and school officials representing 3,962 local governments throughout the state calling on them to place their checkbook level data on OhioCheckbook.com and extending an invitation to partner with his office at no cost to local governments.  These local governments include cities, counties, townships, schools, library districts and other special districts.

A large coalition of statewide and local government organizations have expressed support for OhioCheckbook.com and local government transparency, including:

  • Ohio Municipal League
  • Ohio Township Association
  • Ohio Association of School Business Officials
  • Buckeye Association of School Administrators
  • County Commissioner Association of Ohio
  • County Auditor Association of Ohio
  • Ohio Newspaper Association
  • Ohio Society of CPAs
  • Buckeye Institute
  • Common Cause Ohio

OhioCheckbook.com was launched on December 2, 2014, marking the first time in Ohio history when citizens could actually see every expenditure in state government.  Since its launch, OhioCheckbook.com has received overwhelming support from newspapers and groups across the state and, as of June 8, 2016 there have been more than 551,000 total searches on the site.

OhioCheckbook.com displays more than $529 billion in spending over the past eight years, including more than 146 million transactions.  The website includes cutting-edge features such as:

  • “Google-style” contextual search capabilities, to allow users to sort by keyword, department, category or vendor;
  • Fully dynamic interactive charts to drill down on state spending;
  • Functionality to compare state spending year-over-year or among agencies; and,
  • Capability to share charts or checks with social media networks, and direct contact for agency fiscal offices.

In March 2015, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG) released their annual “Following the Money 2015” report and Treasurer Mandel earned Ohio the number one transparency ranking in the country for providing online access to government spending data.  Ohio was prominently featured in the report after climbing from 46th to 1st in spending transparency as a result of Treasurer Mandel’s release of OhioCheckbook.com.  Due to the launch of OhioCheckbook.com, Ohio received a perfect score of 100 points this year – the highest score in the history of the U.S. PIRG transparency rankings.

In April 2016, U.S. PIRG announced that Treasurer Mandel earned Ohio the number one government transparency ranking in the country for the second consecutive year in a row.  Due to the launch of OhioCheckbook.com, Ohio again received the highest perfect score of 100 points this year – marking the second time in two years Ohio received the highest possible score in the history of the U.S. PIRG transparency rankings.

The Treasurer’s office is partnering with OpenGov, a leading Silicon Valley government technology company, to provide residents of Ohio the ability to view and search local government expenditures in a user-friendly, digital format.  “Ohio is setting the standard for financial transparency on an unprecedented scale. We are excited to partner with the Treasurer’s office to bring world-class technology to communities large and small across the state,” said Zachary Bookman, CEO of OpenGov.

For more information or to view your local government website, visit the Local Government option on OhioCheckbook.com or click on:

  • NorwoodCitySchools.OhioCheckbook.com;
  • ColumbiaTownshipHamilton.OhioCheckbook.com.

Fire levy vote in July

The Columbia Township Board of Trustees will vote Tuesday, July 12, on whether to ask residents who live in the Ridge Fire District to approve a fire levy this fall.

The Hamilton County auditor’s office recently certified that a proposed 3.4-mill levy would cost homeowners in the Ridge Road-Highland Avenue area $119 per $100,000 of the assessed value of their homes annually and generate just over $149,000 for the Ridge Fire District annually.

The July 12 trustees meeting will begin at 6 p.m. at the Columbia Township administration building at 5686 Kenwood Road.

The current fire levy millage in the Ridge Fire District is 6.77.

“The revenue generated by the fire levy in the Ridge Fire District has been less than the cost of the fire protection contract with the Golf Manor Fire Department for several years,” Columbia Township Administrator Michael Lemon said.

“The current levy rate is lower than most other fire levies in the area.

“We must raise the levy to cover the current costs or be faced with seeking alternatives to lower the cost of fire protection,” Lemon said.

“If the trustees vote to move forward in July with placing a levy on the ballot in November, we will ask voters in the Ridge Fire District to preserve our existing fire protection arrangements by voting in favor of the levy.”

Columbia Township has a three-year contract in which it will pay the Golf Manor Fire Department $355,000 this year, $360,000 next year and $370,000 the last year for fire and emergency-medical services in the township’s Ridge Fire District.

Want to know more about what is happening in Columbia Township? Follow me on Twitter @jeannehouck.

Who is affected

The Ridge Fire District includes the Ridge Road and Highland Avenue business district, the Ridgewood subdivision and township streets off Kennedy Avenue.

Streets involved are Blueridge Avenue, Brackenridge Avenue, Charloe Street, Cliffridge Avenue, Crestridge Circle, Dogwood Lane, Donald Drive, Highland Avenue, Hill and Dale Drive, Kennedy Avenue, Kenoak Lane, Losantiridge Avenue, Lucille Drive, Monardi Circle, Ridge Circle, Ridge Road, Ridgewood Avenue and Viewpoint Drive.

Other areas of Columbia Township are served by other fire departments and would not be affected by the possible levy under discussion.

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Walton Creek Road Is Open

hamilton county enginee seal
Hamilton County Engineer
223 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, Ohio  45215
Traffic Department

***NEWS RELEASE***

WALTON CREEK ROAD CLOSURE

******OPEN******

**** Between Muchmore Rd. & Varner Rd.****

IN COLUMBIA TOWNSHIP / INDIAN HILL

 Theodore B. Hubbard, the Hamilton County Engineer, would like to announce that Walton Creek Road between Muchmore and Varner Roads in Columbia Township / Indian Hill, has reopened to thru traffic.

For information on other projects, please visit our web site at: www.hamilton-co.org/engineer

Respectfully,

Theodore B. Hubbard, P.E.-P.S.
Hamilton County Engineer

Column: Mr. Jones, you are wrong about GSCM

DanTellerColumbia Township and The Good Shepherd Catholic Montessori have offered a gift to township residents and school children. Sadly, Carl Jones (May 25, “Columbia Township park issues”) refuses to accept it.

GSCM sits on 13 peaceful acres of hills, fields and woods at the edge of densely populated Madison Place. Naturally, the neighbors are attracted to our campus. When school is not in session, residents walk their dogs on our hills, play hoops on our playground, swing on our playset and chat under our trees.

So when planning to develop an old patch of blacktop into a natural playscape, the school approached the township to explore extending this “de facto” shared use relationship with our neighbors. The result has been a delightful “Community Natural Playscape,” which township administrator Mike Lemon has called a “unique public-private collaboration.”

Funding for the playscape has come from a wide range of sources: private foundations and donors, the Cincinnati Rotary Club, the Mariemont Moms Group, Columbia Township, the state of Ohio, and of course the school’s own parents and PTO.

Labor for the playscape has been equally diverse: school parents laid the drain tile, installed the playset and planted trees. Students planted perennials and spread mulch. Five different Boy Scouts did their Eagle projects on features of the playscape. During one of our six volunteer work days, a neighborhood resident who had brought his children to play in the park stayed for two hours and joined us planting shrubs. What a wonderful expression of community this process has been!

Most significantly, the school has made its private property available for use as a private-public park, sparing the township the cost-prohibitive task of purchasing property, razing houses, and developing a park infrastructure: an exponentially more costly proposition than the $18,500 the township has provided. As a result, an inviting space is within walking distance of Madison Place residents, where previously the nearest township park was over two miles away.

Mr. Jones decries the limitations that school hours place on public access to the park. Actually, there are just 175 school days per year, leaving 190 days of total free access for township residents. In addition, the mellow weekday evenings of spring and fall are times when I have often enjoyed the sight of neighborhood families using our campus and playscape.

Perhaps the most telling symbol of the different lenses with which to view this project is the fence. Mr. Jones views the recent installation of a low split rail fence as a barrier. This is far from the truth. The fence is not to keep people out, but to keep children safe within. It is open at both ends. The gate has no lock. Instead, a sign will soon be installed that invites people to “Play! Enjoy! Explore!” Mr. Jones, I invite you to enter this gate and join me for a summer cup of coffee under our shady oak tree. I hope that you will leave our time together as a friend, not a critic.

Neighbors Opposing Pipeline Extension

 

What are they thinking?

Duke Energy is planning to build a huge gas transmission line right through our neighborhoods.  This is not like the distribution lines under our streets, or the lines that bring power to our homes.  This is an enormous high pressure, high capacity pipeline that would be built next to schools, daycare centers, places of worship, and even through people’s yards.

No one would even consider running a high speed expressway right down the middle of a residential street or right next to a school playground, and then allowing tanker trucks trucks carrying full loads of hazardous chemicals to drive up and down the street, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  That would be unthinkable.  Have you seen how fast truckers go on the expressway?  What if the driver lost control of his vehicle, or what if someone cut him off while switching lanes and he couldn’t stop?  Your kids could be out in the yard playing!  Can you imagine?

Well, for many us in the Cincinnati area, this has become a very real possibility.  Duke Energy is not building an expressway for trucks next to our schools and houses.  Duke Energy is building an expressway for natural gas.  This pipeline contains 720 psi’s in a single inch cube.  Multiply that by the area of the pipe and you get a 507,000 psi catastrophic accident waiting to happen.

Want to learn more about Duke’s Central Corridor Pipeline Extension project in Cincinnati, and what you can do to stop it? Here’s everything you need to know.

Concerned Neighbors – This is a quickly evolving situation, so please forgive us if information is incomplete.  We are madly scrambling to keep you informed.  Check back often and LIKE us on Facebook to stay connected.

Announcement Regarding Ridgewood Subdivision

Ridgewood and Cliffridge Water Main Replacement and Repaving
Greater Cincinnati Water Works (GCWW) advised Columbia Township officials it plans to begin its Ardmore Water Main Project #WW002742 construction on replacing water mains beginning June 13, 2016. The project includes new water mains for Ridgewood and Cliffridge Avenues. The work schedule given is as follows, dependent upon weather:

  • Start layout of the water main               June 13, 2016
  • Start saw-cutting for the water main   June 14, 2016
  • Start laying of the water main               June 20, 2016
  • Start installing fire hydrants                 August 17, 2016
  • Start to test new water main                 August 30, 2016
  • Start tie-ins and services                        August 30, 2016
  • Start the final tie-ins                               November 16, 2016
  • Start final restoration                             Fall 2016

Since the water main construction will require half of Ridgewood and half of Cliffridge to be repaved, the Township tagged onto the project to have the balance of the streets repaved which will save a significant amount of money, increase the lifespan of the streets and improve the look of the streets.

Ridgewood Avenue work will include a new water main and curb-to-curb resurfacing while Cliffridge will include a new water main, curbs, driveway aprons and resurfacing.

The project will begin on Cliffridge. Once GCWW is finished with its water main work, the roadwork will begin and be completed in the fall.

As one might expect, there will be occasional delays, noise and inconveniences. Efforts will be made to keep these to a minimum during the four 10-hour day schedule planned for the job.

Columbia Township trustees weigh fire levy

The possibility that Columbia Township residents who live in the Ridge Fire District may be asked to approve a fire levy this fall is growing closer to a probability.

The township’s Board of Trustees has voted to ask the Hamilton County Auditor to certify how much a 3.4-mill levy would cost homeowners in the Ridge Road-Highland Avenue area annually and how much it would generate for Columbia Township annually.

“After receiving the certification, the trustees will determine whether to pass a resolution to proceed to place a levy on the ballot, which would only affect the Ridge Fire District,” Columbia Township Administrator Michael Lemon said.

Township trustees David Kubicki, board president; Susan Hughes, board vice president, and Christos Kritikos were not immediately available for comment on whether they are leaning toward asking voters to approve a fire levy.

Lemon has said projections show a shortfall in the Ridge Fire District of more than $120,000 per year over the next five years without an increase in revenue.

Columbia Township has a three-year contract in which it will pay the Golf Manor Fire Department $355,000 this year, $360,000 next year and $370,000 the last year for fire and emergency-medical services in the township’s Ridge Fire District.

Other areas of Columbia Township are served by other fire departments and would not be affected by the possible levy under discussion.

The current fire levy millage in the Ridge Fire District is 6.77.

Want to know more about what is happening in Columbia Township? Follow me on Twitter @jeannehouck.

Who is affected?

The Ridge Fire District includes the Ridge Road and Highland Avenue business district, the Ridgewood subdivision and township streets off Kennedy Avenue.

Streets involved are Blueridge Avenue, Brackenridge Avenue, Charloe Street, Cliffridge Avenue, Crestridge Circle, Dogwood Lane, Donald Drive, Highland Avenue, Hill and Dale Drive, Kennedy Avenue, Kenoak Lane, Losantiridge Avenue, Lucille Drive, Monardi Circle, Ridge Circle, Ridge Road, Ridgewood Avenue and Viewpoint Drive.